Emergency Services

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Please CLICK HERE to learn which zone you are in, in the event of a storm. 


Click on icon below for 12 page brochure on How to Prepare for a Winter Storm
Prepared by FEMA

  


CLICK on the above icon to read the first newsletter published by OEM. 


Unique Needs of Children in Emergencies

When disaster strikes, children are the most volunterable. When the people, places and routines they depend on for safety and wellbeing are affected by upheaval, children cannot adjust on their own.
The following unique needs of children in emergencies need to be addressed in emergency planning and preparatioin to help ensure children are safe and protected from harm.

CLICK HERE


The MultiJurisdictional Natural Hazard Mitigation Plan Draft Update for Monmouth County is now available for review by clicking the link below. The review will last for 28 days beginning on October 21, 2014.  Additionally, public comments can be sent to the following email address: oemmitigation@mcsonj.org.  

Lastly, because of the large number of appendix files available,  the appendices are available to be downloaded from a Zip file.  Click on the Appendices link below, and once downloaded, unzip the file to view the appendices files.

Hazard Mitigation Planning

Natural hazards have the potential to cause property loss, loss of life, economic hardship, and threats to public health and safety. While an important aspect of emergency management deals with disaster recovery those actions that a community must take to repair damages and make itself whole in the wake of a natural disaster an equally important aspect of emergency management involves hazard mitigation. Hazard mitigation measures are efforts taken before a disaster happens to lessen the impact that future disasters of that type will have on people and property in the community. They are things you do today to be more protected in the future. Hazard mitigation actions taken in advance of a hazard event are essential to breaking the typical disaster cycle of damage, reconstruction, and repeated damage. With careful selection, hazard mitigation actions can be long-term, cost-effective means of reducing the risk of loss and help create a more disaster-resistant and sustainable community.


“The Neptune Township Office of Emergency Management and the Neptune Township Police Department are pleased to announce the release of two mobile applications. This platform will allow us to expand our capability to communicate with our community. These mobile applications, which are available for Android and Apple devices provide our citizens with current information and emergency alerts regarding public safety in our community. The applications include personal safety and preparedness information as well as current “most wanted” listings, submit a tip and emergency alerts.”

Go to the App Store (iPhone) or the Google Play Store (Android) and search for “Neptune Township; both applications will come up.

For Android users, click here for OEM app; click here for Police Department

Click here for an important video: Building a Digital Disaster Kit
Helpful tips: 

  • Having an extra cord/charger
  • Having an extra battery
  • Charging the phone using your car 
  • Etc

STAY CONNECTED NEPTUNE!

 


FEMA GET READY-BE PREPARED FORMS
Preparing Makes Sense Preparing for People with Disabilities and Special Needs
Preparing for Older Americans Family Communication Plan
Emergency Supply Checklist Emergency Kit for Kids
Register Ready Form Sign up for Emergency Calls

Let’s Get Ready!
Click on link for tips on being prepared for an emergency
(The American Public Health Association’s Get Ready team spoofs Carly Rae Jepsen’s “Call Me Maybe” in “Let’s Get Ready!” a song about emergency preparedness.)




 

 
Click on the icon above for more information 

VOLUNTEERS WANTED FOR THE NEPTUNE TOWNSHIP “COMMUNITY EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM”

Neptune Township announces that it is welcoming interested residents to join the Neptune Township Community Emergency Response Team (C.E.R.T.)

What is C.E.R.T.?  The Community Emergency Response Team concept was developed and implemented by the Los Angeles City Fire Department (LAFD) in 1985. The Whittier Narrows earthquake in 1987 underscored the area-wide threat of a major disaster in California. Further, it confirmed the need for training civilians to meet their immediate needs. As a result, the LAFD created the Disaster Preparedness Division with the purpose of training citizens and private and government employees.

Interested volunteers will be required to fill out an application and successfully pass a background check.  Once complete, new members must attend the basic C.E.R.T. training class.  This program will educate members about disaster preparedness for hazards that may impact their area and trains them in basic disaster response skills, such as fire safety, light search and rescue, team organization, and disaster medical operations. Using the training learned in the classroom and during exercises, C.E.R.T. members can assist others in their neighborhood or workplace following an event when professional responders are not immediately available to help. C.E.R.T. members also are encouraged to support emergency response agencies by taking a more active role in emergency preparedness projects in their community.

Other responsibilities that C.E.R.T. members may be asked to perform include assisting at shelter sites, emergency notifications, support functions for emergency responders, assisting at community events and more.

C.E.R.T. is about readiness, people helping people, rescuer safety, and doing the greatest good for the greatest number. C.E.R.T. is a positive and realistic approach to emergency and disaster situations where citizens will be initially on their own and their actions can make a difference.

Interested residents can register by contacting srowe@neptunetownship.org or by calling (732) 988-5200 x 242.  

Click here for form

 


NEW Fall 2014 Superstorm Sandy Recovery Survey
The Sandy Recovery Survey aims to keep the issues facing those most affected by the storm in the public eye, and to provide policy makers with useful information as they respond to the unmet needs of their constituents and to help plan for future disaster response.
 
CLICK HERE for the new survey.
Please note you can take the survey confidentially without sharing personal information such as your name or contact information. 
If you have any questions or comments about this survey, please contact the Monmouth University Polling Institute at polling@monmouth.edu or 732-263-5860.

 

 


 

VOLUNTEERS WANTED FOR THE NEPTUNE TOWNSHIP “COMMUNITY EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM”

Neptune Township announces that it is welcoming interested residents to join the Neptune Township Community Emergency Response Team (C.E.R.T.)

What is C.E.R.T.?  The Community Emergency Response Team concept was developed and implemented by the Los Angeles City Fire Department (LAFD) in 1985. The Whittier Narrows earthquake in 1987 underscored the area-wide threat of a major disaster in California. Further, it confirmed the need for training civilians to meet their immediate needs. As a result, the LAFD created the Disaster Preparedness Division with the purpose of training citizens and private and government employees.

Interested volunteers will be required to fill out an application and successfully pass a background check.  Once complete, new members must attend the basic C.E.R.T. training class.  This program will educate members about disaster preparedness for hazards that may impact their area and trains them in basic disaster response skills, such as fire safety, light search and rescue, team organization, and disaster medical operations. Using the training learned in the classroom and during exercises, C.E.R.T. members can assist others in their neighborhood or workplace following an event when professional responders are not immediately available to help. C.E.R.T. members also are encouraged to support emergency response agencies by taking a more active role in emergency preparedness projects in their community.

Other responsibilities that C.E.R.T. members may be asked to perform include assisting at shelter sites, emergency notifications, support functions for emergency responders, assisting at community events and more.

A welcome meeting, orientation and training classes are expected to begin in the Fall 2014.

C.E.R.T. is about readiness, people helping people, rescuer safety, and doing the greatest good for the greatest number. C.E.R.T. is a positive and realistic approach to emergency and disaster situations where citizens will be initially on their own and their actions can make a difference.

Interested residents can register by contacting srowe@neptunetownship.org or by calling (732) 988-5200 x 242.  Applications are due by September 30, 2014.

Click here for form

 

 


Click on the link below for the brochure


Click on the graphic below, for a full-size winter weather advisory


CLICK HERE for evacuation route. Hit CTRL and the plus sign to make it larger. (CRTL +). Continue to hit the keys to enlarge it.


Click on icon below to be directed to more information on Hurricane Preparedness:


STAY PREPARED: HURRICANE SEASON DOESN’T END WITH SUMMER

TRENTON, N.J. - Hurricane season officially begins each year on June 1, but unlike firemen’s fairs, cookouts and fun at the beach, the season for hurricanes doesn’t end along with the summer.

As you begin planning your back-to-school shopping, now may be a good time to check your stock of batteries, bottled water and other emergency supplies that may be needed should New Jersey experience an autumn hurricane.

While storm frequency tends to peak in August and September, hurricane season in the United States extends to November 30, and while the risk of a Thanksgiving storm may seem remote, it could happen.

Last year’s Superstorm Sandy only missed it by a few weeks.

Sandy made landfall in New Jersey as a tropical cyclone on October 29, flooding coastal communities, taking down trees, tearing up infrastructure and demolishing homes and businesses throughout the state. Forty New Jersey residents lost their lives. Nine months later, the recovery continues. The storm is projected to be the second costliest in United States history after Katrina, an August 29 storm that devastated New Orleans and the Gulf Coast in 2005.

Like Sandy, many of the most destructive storms in United States history have occurred after Labor Day, causing massive loss of life and property damage in the billions.

On September 8, 1900, a category 4 hurricane engulfed Galveston Island, Texas. Storm tides as high as 15 feet swept away homes and businesses, killing an estimated 8,000 people.

On September 18, 1920, a category 4 hurricane bearing the highest sustained winds ever recorded at that time slammed into Miami Beach and downtown Miami. Believing the storm was over, thousands of people emerged from their homes during a half-hour lull at the eye of the storm and were trapped without shelter as it regained its ferocity. Every building in downtown Miami was either damaged or destroyed and hundreds of people were killed. The storm then crossed into the Gulf of Mexico, where it destroyed virtually every pier, vessel and warehouse on the Pensacola coast.

In the end, more than 800 people were reported missing after the storm and though records are incomplete, the Red Cross recorded 373 deaths and 6,381 injuries as a result of the hurricane.

On September 20 and 21, 1938, a fast-moving hurricane struck the Mid-Atlantic and New England with such force that thousands of people were taken by surprise. On Long Island, some 20 people watching an afternoon movie at a local cinema were swept out to sea and drowned. One of them was the projectionist. In downtown Providence, Rhode Island, flood waters rapidly flooded streets, submerging automobiles and street cars as their occupants fled to the high floors of office buildings to escape drowning. The record-breaking storm was responsible for 600 deaths, causing $308 million in damage in the midst of the Great Depression.

On October 14, 1954, Hurricane Hazel made landfall as a Category 4 hurricane near Calabash, North Carolina, inundating the coastline with an 18-foot storm surge on a lunar high tide. When the storm passed, only 5 of 357 buildings in Long Beach, North Carolina were still standing. The Raleigh, North Carolina Weather reported that “all traces of civilization on the immediate waterfront between the state line and Cape Fear were practically annihilated.” Nineteen people were killed in North Carolina, with several hundred more injured; 15,000 homes were destroyed and another 39,000 were damaged.

On September 11, 1960, Hurricane Donna barreled across Florida, then traveled east through North Carolina, the Mid-Atlantic states and New England, causing $387 million in damage in the United States and $13 million elsewhere along its path.

Accounts like the ones above illustrate the importance of making a plan to protect your family and property from the potentially devastating effects of a hurricane or tropical storm.

With that in mind, why not take a minute to inventory your emergency supplies and schedule a trip to the store to stock up on items that you may need in an emergency.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency’s website, www.ready.gov, has as wealth of information on how to plan, prepare and protect your family should another disaster like Sandy occur in the coming months.


DISASTER PREPAREDNESS COSTS LITTLE, SAVES A LOT

LINCROFT, N.J. — Just as every home should have a smoke alarm, every home should have an emergency supply kit packed and ready. Being prepared doesn’t have to cost a lot of money.

“Although federal, state and local governments are ready to assist the public during times of emergencies and disasters, you should be prepared to take care of yourself and members of your family for the first 72 hours – that’s three days – following a disaster such as a hurricane, severe winter storm or an ice storm,” said Gracia Szczech, FEMA’s Federal Coordinating Officer for New Jersey. “A big part of disaster preparation is knowledge and FEMA has developed a comprehensive guide to help folks prepare.”

FEMA’s disaster preparedness website, www.ready.gov is a destination site for information about getting your family prepared for a disaster.

Commercially available disaster kits can range from $75 to $300 and up, but most of the pieces of a disaster kit are already in the home and just need to be gathered together and stored in one place.  

An emergency preparedness kit needs to include food and a minimum of one gallon of water for each member of the family, including pets, per day for three days, a battery-powered or hand-crank radio, flashlight, spare batteries, first aid kit, non-electric can opener, local maps and personal sanitation items such as hand sanitizer, moist towelettes, toilet paper, garbage bags and plastic ties.

Your kit should include important family papers such as wills or property deeds and personal identification and any prescription medicines a family member may be taking.

Other items to consider include sleeping bags or blankets, paper towels, books, puzzles and games for children, food and medications for family pets.

It’s helpful to have cash in case banks are closed and there is no power for ATMs.

Remember, many shelters will not accept pets, so make sure you have a plan that protects all your family members.

The emergency supplies can be stored in an easy-to-carry plastic storage container or sports bag, making them easy to grab and go when an emergency forces people to leave their homes.

Experts agree being displaced during and after a disaster is especially difficult for children and the elderly.  

The loss of familiar surroundings, schools, favorite toys and pets all contribute to the sense of loss. Including a few favorite toys or stuffed animals in the kit can help with this, but parents should be alert for behavior changes which can be an indication of stress.

 


Monmouth County has recently received grant funding from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to update its 2009 Multi-Jurisdictional Hazard Mitigation Plan.

The Multi-Jurisdictional Natural Hazard Mitigation Plan for Monmouth County was prepared between 2007 and 2009 to meet the requirements of the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 (DMA 2000), which requires all states and local governments to have a hazard mitigation plan in order to be eligible to apply for certain types of federal hazard mitigation project grants.  FEMA grant monies were received to cover the costs of the plan’s development.  Monmouth County used a ‘multi-jurisdictional’ approach, inviting all of the municipalities within the County to participate in the plan. At that time, 52 of the County’s 53 jurisdictions opted to participate. This opened the door for the County and each of its 52 participating jurisdictions to apply to FEMA for hazard mitigation project funding, including monies which became available under recent Federal disaster declarations for Hurricane Irene and the remnants of Tropical Storm Lee in 2011, and Superstorm Sandy in 2012. All plan participants have been working since the plan was initially approved by FEMA in 2009 to complete the projects that were listed in their mitigation strategies.

The mitigation plan update process began in June 2012. A draft of the updated plan is targeted for release at the end of November 2013.

Click here for the full release.


SNOW EMERGENCY  INFORMATION

Click here for information regarding snow removal and parking regulations when a snow emergency is declared.

 


Managing the Emotional Impact of Super Storm Sandy

Super storm known as Sandy has devastated many New Jersey communities and wreaked havoc in people’s lives all along the East Coast.  More than 50 million Americans are coping with the aftermath of the storm.  The damage and destruction from coastal surges, power outages, and high winds have resulted in disruptions to school and work schedules, property destruction, and serious financial consequences.

No one who lives through a disaster is untouched by the experience.  Like other disasters, severe storms and flooding can result in emotional distress, as well as property damage.  Disasters can threaten our sense of control and safety, and can affect many aspects of our lives.  The emotional trauma caused by the storm and anxiety about what will happen next can complicate and impede recovery.  While protecting people and restoring safety, power, and property, is a priority in the wake of natural disasters, emotional coping also matters.

The New Jersey Department of Human Services’ Division of Mental Health and Addiction Services - Disaster and Terrorism Branch, is coordinating statewide efforts to help individuals and communities manage the emotional impact of the storm.  Disaster Mental Health Teams are currently providing support in many shelters around the state and are mobilizing to assist and FEMA Disaster Recovery Centers over the coming days, weeks and months as needed.  In addition to providing face-to-face disaster crisis counseling, the Disaster and Terrorism Branch provides informational materials about coping, and partners with the Mental Health Association in New Jersey to offer assistance through a toll free Disaster Mental Health Helpline:  (877) 294-HELP (4357).  A TTY line is available for the deaf and hearing impaired at (877) 294-4356.

Many Ways to React… Many Ways to Cope

It is important to remember that there is no one correct way to react emotionally to storms and floods.  Not everyone reacts the same way, and in fact, you may react in a variety of different ways even in the course of the same day.  Each person gets through the emotional challenges of a disaster in their own time and on their own terms.

To help you manage the emotions associated with the storm and flood, you should use the coping mechanisms that are familiar and comfortable for you.  Other ideas for coping are suggested below and can be discussed with counselors and other caregivers.

If you or someone that you know is having an acute emotional reaction that does not subside over the period of a few days, it may be best to seek the assistance of a medical or mental health professional.

Predicting and Preparing for Emotional Reactions

Not everyone will have an immediate or obvious emotional reaction to a disaster; those who do will react in their own unique way.  Some of the more typical emotional reactions may include:

•  Recurring dreams or nightmares about the event; 
•  Trouble concentrating or remembering things; 
•  Feeling numb, withdrawn or disconnected; 
•  Disturbances in eating and sleeping patterns; 
•  Having bursts of anger or intense irritability; 
•  Persistent physical symptoms (i.e., headaches, digestive problems, muscle tension, etc.); 
•  Being overprotective of your family’s safety; 
•  Avoiding reminders of the violent events or evacuation; 
•   Being tearful or crying for no apparent reason


For people returning home from a disaster-affected area, it is not uncommon to experience difficulty in “decompressing” and reintegrating back into the home and workplace.

What Helps…

Here are some useful suggestions for coping with the stress stemming from disasters and or traumatic events:

Limit your exposure to graphic news stories;

 
Get accurate, timely information about the status of the situation from credible sources;
Try to return to your normal daily routine;
Exercise, eat well and rest; 
Stay busy- physically and mentally;
Communicate with friends, family and supporters;
Use spirituality and your personal beliefs;


What Doesn’t Help…

There are several behaviors that can slow or complicate the emotional recovery process. These include:

•  Using drugs or alcohol to cope; 
•  Withdrawing from friends or family; 
•  Blaming others; 
•  Overeating or failing to eat; 
•  Withdrawing from pleasant activities; 
•  Working too much; 
•  Anger or violence; 

Staying Connected
The best source of assistance in dealing with the emotional consequences of a disaster is often found in each other.  If you are anxious about your experience, talk to someone you love or trust.  This may be a family member, friend, clergy member or teacher.  Just don’t keep your thoughts and feelings to yourself.

If you notice that a loved one, friend or co-worker’s behavior has substantially changed, reach out and ask them how they are doing.  Make some time to talk, when it is convenient for both of you, and follow up later on to see how they are doing.  Watching out for each other demonstrates that you care and it can be comforting to both of you.

For more information about the emotional impact of disasters and strategies and techniques for coping, please click on the link below to download the brochure, “Coping with the Emotional Consequences of Storms.”     


             Click here for English                Click here for Spanish

Source: NJ Department of Human Services


Hurricane Survival Guide

hurricane preparedness

Click here for the 20 page guide

 


Monmouth County Multi-Jurisdictional Hazard Mitigation Plan

“In 2009 Neptune Township joined with the County of Monmouth and our neighboring communities to develop the “Monmouth County Multi-Jurisdictional Hazard Mitigation Plan”.  

Natural hazards have the potential to cause property loss, loss of life, economic hardship, and threats to public health and safety. While an important aspect of emergency management deals with disaster recovery those actions that a community must take to repair damages and make itself whole in the wake of a natural disaster an equally important aspect of emergency management involves hazard mitigation. Hazard mitigation measures are efforts taken before a disaster happens to lessen the impact that future disasters of that type will have on people and property in the community. They are things you do today to be more protected in the future.  

FEMA requires regular updates of approved Hazard Mitigation Plans. The update process has begun in Monmouth County. Part of this process includes public outreach. The Township’s Office of Emergency Management is providing this link to the County’s Hazard Mitigation Plan Update page as part of the public outreach process.

Neptune OEM will be conducting a number of public presentations on the Hazard Mitigation Plan as the update process continues.

Click here for the link

Source: Vito Gadaleta, Assistant Business Administrator

 


 

OEM All Hazards Plan-
An Emergency Preparedness Guide for Residents

Please click here for the slide show (large file)


SNOW EMERGENCY  INFORMATION

 

Click here for information regarding snow removal and parking regulations when a snow emergency is declared.

 

 


Four Steps to Safety
A Guide produced by the Office of Emergency Management

  • Find out what could happen to you
  • Create a disaster plan
  • Complete the check list
  • Practice and maintain your plan

Click below to read, review and print the comprehensive guide produced by the Neptune Township Office of Emergency Management. In addition to providing details to the above, the manual describes hazards most likely to impact Neptune residents and visitors.

Emergencies Guide

Hurricanes can be dangerous killers. Learning the hurricane warning messages and planning ahead can reduce the chances of injury or major property damage.

Click here for a comprehensive guide to hurricanes prepared by
Neptune Township Office of Emergency Management

Source: Michael Bascom, Neptune OEM Deputy Coordinator



register ready logo

 

The Township of Neptune Office of Emergency Management, in cooperation with the NJ Office of Emergency Management and the NJ Office of Homeland Security and Preparedness, maintains a statewide registry for residents with special needs.

This survey is voluntary and free. It is designed to assist first responders and emergency planners in identifying those residents that may need assistance in evacuating during an emergency so they may develop the necessary plans.

It will also aid emergency planners in the development of shelter plans for those residents with special needs.

The Special Needs Registry is designed to help emergency responders locate and safely evacuate people who could find it difficult to help themselves in the event of a major disaster, such as a hurricane.

The Registry has been established to collect information emergency responders will need to help locate and evacuate people with Special Needs during an emergency, when a family or caregiver are unable to help them.

You, or someone on your behalf, should register if you may find it difficult to get to safety with family or friends or to a public shelter during an emergency evacuation, because of a physical or cognitive limitation, language barrier, or lack of transportation.

Register online: Special Needs registry

Print out the form and mail to Roberta Grace,  PO Box 1125, Neptune NJ 07754-1125

Or Call 211 and register over the phone.

For a copy of the brochure, click here

 

The following is an account of an emergency drill held on

September 27, 2005 in Neptune Township:

Seventy-five people were injured today when three assailants tossed fire bombs inside a local nightclub at approximately 6:30 PM last evening. As responders arrived, those who were able to escape the inferno inside the club lay in the parking lot with burns, trample injuries and respiratory problems. The victims moaned in pain and cried for help as blood flowed, blisters formed and breathing became more difficult.

Within minutes, Neptune Police, Fire, Emergency Medical Services and Emergency Management responders arrived on scene and rushed into action. Within minutes, the fire was under control and victims were triaged by EMT’s, simultaneously, requests for mutual aid resources initiated the activation of the local and county Emergency Operations Plans.

A mile away a specialized police unit surrounded a house where three the suspects were found to be hiding. Flash grenades and gunfire erupted as the armed suspects attempted to elude the police. Within two hours, all three suspects were arrested.

Site preparation resulted in the presence of heavy smoke and victims with realistic looking injuries as first responders arrived. The scenario prepared by local and county emergency management officials was realistic and helped more than 350 first responders hone their skills and test their planning for a real emergency.

The emergency response exercise conducted at the Headliner Nightclub on Route 35 in Neptune last evening was intended to provide local and county agencies the opportunity to test plans to respond to a large scale incident with possible terrorist involvement.

Overall, the exercise was deemed a success. All segments of the emergency response, including law enforcement, fire, emergency medical services, hazardous materials response, emergency management, communications, hospitals and responder rehabilitation reported success regarding their involvement in the exercise.

Deficiencies were noted and will discussed as part of the after action review to be conducted by the exercise design team and the evaluation team. Once a review of the response is completed, emergency plans will be updated and future training and funding will be directed at addressing the deficiencies.

As the scenario progressed, victims were triaged and treated on scene before being transported to four County hospitals. At Jersey Shore University Medical Center, victims were decontaminated before being provided access to the hospital as early indications introduced the possibility of a radiological release as a part of the fire bombing.

 

The radiological release proved to be a hoax deployed by the suspects to delay treatment of the victims. Victims also arrived at Monmouth Medical Center, Bayshore Community Hospital and CentraState Medical Center who participated in the exercise to test their external disaster plans.

The agency was conducted by the Monmouth County Office of Emergency Management and the Neptune Township Office of Emergency Management. Over 40 agencies, including four law enforcement agencies, five fire departments, twenty-five first aid squads and EMS agencies, a hazardous materials team, two emergency management agencies, four field communications units, the Neptune Department of Public Works, the New Jersey Department of Transportation, and the Salvation Army took part in the response. The exercise was overseen by the New Jersey State Police – Office of Emergency Management and evaluated by experts in various response disciplines.

Overall, the four hour exercise, which had been planned for months, tested eight different components of the local and county emergency operations plans.

“Exercises such as this are developed to create chaos and see who our response agencies can manage or control that chaos”, stated Michael Bascom, who serves as the Neptune Township Deputy Emergency Management Coordinator and the Monmouth County Emergency Medical Services Coordinator. “I was very impressed with the level of professionalism, coordination and cooperation that was displayed by all agencies involved.

Neptune Mayor Thomas Catley praised the volunteer and career responders for their dedication. “I was overwhelmed by the scope of the exercise and the effort put into ensuring that our emergency services are well-prepared to handle a major event. I am hopeful that the Governor and the Legislature recognize this commitment by supporting future Homeland Security Grant applications submitted by municipalities throughout Monmouth County.”

Neptune Township Committeeman James W. Manning Jr. was impressed by the realism, “An exercise like this really makes you realize how vulnerable we are to such an emergency. You really have to compliment the hard work and life-changing commitment these first responders make to the community.”

Neptune Township Police Chief Howard O’Neil spoke of the need to continually invest in the enhancement of local emergency response activities as evidenced by the drill as well as by recent disasters in the Gulf Coast and New York City. “The local and county first responders make all the difference in how a community survives a disaster or large scale emergency. We have seen this more and more lately and we have remained dedicated to providing Neptune Township and Monmouth County with the best emergency preparedness programs possible.”

Both Neptune Township and Monmouth County receive annual emergency management assistance grant funding which requires annual exercises to test and validate their emergency operations plans. In addition, both agencies continually conduct Local Emergency Planning Committee meetings to review and update their emergency operations plans to address new threats and vulnerabilities.

 

 


 

Office of Emergency Management

Ext. 241, Michael Bascom, Emergency Management Coordinator

Ext. 242 Sharon Rowe, Departmental Secretary

Ext. 630 Kevin Devlin, Deputy Emergency Management Coordinator

Ext. 631 Michael DiLeo, Deputy Emergency Management Coordinator.